The Molesworth Gallery
 

Thomas Brezing

bridge

Made of breath only ~ diptych, oil on canvas ~ 180 x 280cm (Collection: The Office of Public Works)

 

 

 

How long will you forget me forever ~ oil on canvas ~ 150 x 150 cm (Private collection)

 

 

Brezing

You said it was night inside my heart ~ oil on paper ~ 54 x 68 cm  (Private collection)

 

 

___“It is Thomas Brezing’s insatiable curiosity - intellectually, spiritually and philosophically - and the remarkable generosity of will that he invests in his art and life that makes him such a considerable artist.”
Patrick Graham, September 2014

___Thomas Brezing says that he works ‘against beauty’, believing that too much ‘beauty’ can be a dangerous thing. This drives him to push his paintings till they go ‘off-kilter’. He rotates them, sometimes using the upside down version in the final work. The brushstrokes are thick and there is vigour and a physicality to his method – often throwing paint at his canvasses – enabling chance elements to arise and defying accuracy.
___His practice owes to a tradition we can trace back to German Expressionism and Neo-Expressionism’s concerns for the figurative and fantastical symbolism. He resonates too with fellow German contemporaries, such as Neo Rauch and Daniel Richter - the former with his mix of personal histories and politics, and, the latter, for his narrative, opulent scenes with their ghost-like presences. But Brezing finds his own distinctive path. The quest for identity, sharpened by self-chosen exile in Ireland, is for ‘something missing’,  ‘a certain homelessness’ underpinned by what Hugo Hamilton calls ‘the loneliness of being German’.
___It is through such poetic sensibilities that Brezing comes to consider the world (and his place in it) through his art.  And, for Brezing, this world is made as the wolf trapper sees it in Cormac McCarthy’s novel, The Crossing, as ‘something you cannot touch. You cannot hold it in your hand for it is made of breath only.’  Memory, experience and speculation combine in Brezing’s art to open multiple dimensions; many possibilities of reality within invisible borders of time, so that he might touch upon the something missing.

Extracted from 'That something missing', an essay on Brezing's work by Cliodhna Shaffrey

___Thomas Brezing was born in Germany in 1969 and moved to Ireland in the 1990’s. He has had three solo exhibitions at The Molesworth Gallery in 2009, 2012 and 2014 and has shown at museums and arts centres such as The Irish Museum of Modern Art (group), the Lapua Art Museum, Finland (two-person), The Highlanes in Drogheda, Draiocht in Dublin, the LAB in Dublin, and at the Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin (all solo). He has also contributed to group exhibitions in Germany, Wales, England and Belgium.
_ _Brezing was nominated for the AIB Prize in 2003 and 2010. He has also been the recipient of numerous Arts Council awards, Fingal Co. Council awards and residencies. His work is included in the Nationalo Portrait Collection and the collections of the Office of Public Works, Mayo County Council, Dundalk District Council and the Boyle Civic Collection.

 

Curriculum Vitae

Thomas Brezing was born in Germany in 1969 and moved to Ireland in the early 1990's.

Exhibitions (solo unless otherwise stated)

2016 Molesworth Gallery, Dublin, 'Jonah and the whale'

2015 Droichead Arts Centre, Drogheda, 'The road is paved with good intentions'

2014 Molesworth Gallery, Dublin, 'The art of finding a remote place'

2012 Molesworth Gallery, Dublin, 'High Violet'

2012 The Irish Museum of Modern Art (group)
2011 Highlanes Municipal Gallery, Drogheda, 'The Art of Failure isn't hard to master', read the article by Aidan Dunne in The Irish Times

2009 Molesworth Gallery, Dublin, 'All of this could be true'
2008 Draiocht, Blanchardstown, Dublin 'New Works on Paper'
2008 Seahorse Gallery, Co. Dublin 'Heaven was in the sky'
2007 The Lab, Dublin 'Seven Miles Above the Earth
2006 Ard Bia Gallery, Galway 'The world is over there'
2005 Ashford Gallery, RHA, Dublin 'Remember when we were older?'
2002 South Tipperary Arts Centre, 'Something that could have lived'

 

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